Symposium

Confronting Child Labor in Global Agricultural Supply Chains

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS, SCHOOL OF LAW
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014 

The problem of harmful child labor in agriculture persists despite international treaties and efforts to end it. Poverty, limited education, poor agricultural technology, and other factors such as the insufficient capacity for labor monitoring in remote rural areas make it difficult to effectively address and eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The problem exists within various agriculture sectors across continents, from the cotton farms in Uzbekistan, to cocoa farms in West Africa, to the tea plantations in Rwanda and Kenya and palm oil plantations in Indonesia and Malaysia. 

This conference will identify contemporary practices to confront the worst forms of child labor in agriculture from bolstering community education, to combating poverty and implementing practical and sustainable monitoring systems. Seeking to correct the dearth of legal and policy scholarship on this major international human rights issue, this symposium will bring together an interdisciplinary group of global experts—from academia, governments, NGOs, inter-governmental organizations and businesses—to identify current challenges and chart a more innovative path forward in the global undertaking to eliminate the worst forms of child labor in agriculture.

For more information, please visit www.childlaborconference.com

Previous Events:

2014 Symposim Speakers

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Ms. Constance Thomas Director of the International Labour Organization’s International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour

Ms. Constance Thomas

Director of the International Labour Organization’s
International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour

SPEAKERS

Mr. Eric Biel Acting Associate Deputy Undersecretary for International Affairs | U.S. Department of Labor

Mr. Eric Biel

Acting Associate Deputy Undersecretary for International Affairs | U.S. Department of Labor

Eric Biel joined the Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) at the U.S. Department of Labor in February 2012. He is part of ILAB’s senior leadership team, working on a diverse set of projects and activities, including supply chain issues across different sectors and submissions under the labor chapters of free trade agreements. Before joining the Department, Mr. Biel was Managing Director for Corporate Responsibility at Burson-Marsteller, a global consulting firm. From 2003-06 he was Deputy Washington Director and Senior Counsel of Human Rights First (formerly the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights). Prior to that he was Senior Vice President and General Counsel at Fontheim International, a Washington consulting and law practice.

Mr. Biel served in senior positions at the U.S. Department of Commerce from 1997-2000, including Deputy Undersecretary for Trade Policy and Acting Director of the Office of Policy and Strategic Planning. From 1995-97, he was Director of the Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy, a bipartisan body chaired by Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. From 1990-95, he was International Trade Counsel at the Senate Finance Committee, following five years in private law practice.

He received a B.A. in history from Johns Hopkins and joint degrees in law from Yale Law School and public policy from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton. Eric Biel joined the Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) at the U.S. Department of Labor in February 2012. He is part of ILAB’s senior leadership team, working on a diverse set of projects and activities, including supply chain issues across different sectors and submissions under the labor chapters of free trade agreements. Before joining the Department, Mr. Biel was Managing Director for Corporate Responsibility at Burson-Marsteller, a global consulting firm. From 2003-06 he was Deputy Washington Director and Senior Counsel of Human Rights First (formerly the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights). Prior to that he was Senior Vice President and General Counsel at Fontheim International, a Washington consulting and law practice. Mr. Biel served in senior positions at the U.S. Department of Commerce from 1997-2000, including Deputy Undersecretary for Trade Policy and Acting Director of the Office of Policy and Strategic Planning. From 1995-97, he was Director of the Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy, a bipartisan body chaired by Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. From 1990-95, he was International Trade Counsel at the Senate Finance Committee, following five years in private law practice.

He received a B.A. in history from Johns Hopkins and joint degrees in law from Yale Law School and public policy from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton.

 

Prof. Alfred Babo Associate Professor of Anthropology and Sociology | University of Bouaké, Côte d’Ivoire Currently Visiting Professor at Smith College

Prof. Alfred Babo

Associate Professor of Anthropology and Sociology | University of Bouaké, Côte d’Ivoire
Currently Visiting Professor at Smith College

Alfred Babo is Associate Professor and Researcher in the University of Bouaké’s Department of Anthropology and Sociology in Côte d’Ivoire. Professor Babo is a prominent scholar and advocate for sustainable socioeconomic and sociopolitical development, both in his native Côte d’Ivoire and West Africa as a whole. He is a member of the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, the American Political Sciences Association and the Société Suisse d’Etude Africaines.

A specialist in development theory, social change, and conflict and post-conflict society, Professor Babo has published on public policy issues ranging from elections to youth sociopolitical movements to rural land disputes. He has also worked extensively with international organizations on research projects and trainings aimed at promoting peace and sustainable development in Côte d’Ivoire and West Africa more generally. For example, he collaborated with the Swiss International Cocoa Initiative Foundation to lead trainings and deliver lectures on just practices in cocoa production that protect child laborers. In recognition of his work, the Royal Museum for Central Africa in Belgium awarded him with the 2004 Belgian Development Cooperation Prize, given annually to a scholar committed to “sustainable development in the South.”

 

Prof. Anupam Chander Director, California International Law Center Professor of Law, University of California, Davis School of Law

Prof. Anupam Chander

Director, California International Law Center Professor of Law, University of California, Davis School of Law

Prof. Andrew S. Dillon Assistant Professor of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics Michigan State University

Prof. Andrew S. Dillon

Assistant Professor of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
Michigan State University

Andrew Dillon is Assistant Professor at Michigan State University in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics. He is currently involved in randomized evaluations of projects in Burkina Faso, El Salvador, Ghana, Mali and Nigeria. His research includes work on household labor supply and education decisions, the agriculture, health and nutrition nexus, and social networks. Andrew holds a PhD in Applied Economics and Management from Cornell University and was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Mali from 1999-2001. Before coming to Michigan State, he was a research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Some of his publications include: “Child Labor Responses to Production and Health Shocks in Northern Mali,” Journal of African Economies (2012); “Do household definitions matter in survey design? Results from a randomized survey experiment in Mali,” Journal of Development Economics (2012); “Explaining Variation in Child Labor Statistics” Journal of Development Economics (2012) (co-authored with Elena Bardasi, Kathleen Beegle, and Pieter Serneels); “The Effect of Irrigation on Poverty Reduction, Asset Accumulation and Informal Insurance: Evidence from Northern Mali,” World Development (2011); “Do Labor Statistics Depend on How and to Whom the Questions Are Asked? Results from a Survey Experiment in Tanzania,” World Bank Economic Review (2011) (co-authored with Elena Bardasi, Kathleen Beegle and Pieter Serneels). “Measuring Child Labor: Comparisons between Hours Data and Subjective Measures,” Research in Labor Economics (2009). 

Prof. Erika George Professor of Law & Co-Director | Center for Global Justice University of Utah, S.J. Quinney College of Law

Prof. Erika George

Professor of Law & Co-Director | Center for Global Justice
University of Utah, S.J. Quinney College of Law

Professor Erika George is

currently Professor of Law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law. She currently serves as special counsel to the Women’s Rights Division of Human Rights Watch. She was co-chair of the Africa Interest Group of the American Society of International Law and a founding Advisory Board Member of the University of Utah’s Tanner Center for Nonviolent Human Rights Advocacy.

Professor George’s research interests include globalization and the indivisible, interdependent, and interrelated nature of civil liberties and socioeconomic rights; cultural pluralism and rights universalism; gender violence and gender equality; justice and peace promotion in post-conflict societies; environmental justice; and the use of documentary film in human rights advocacy and education. Her current research explores the responsibility of transnational corporations to respect international human rights and various efforts to hold business enterprises accountable for alleged abuses.

Professor George earned a B.A. with honors from the University of Chicago and a J.D. from Harvard Law School, where she served as Articles Editor of the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review. She also holds an M.A. in International Relations from the University of Chicago.

She is writing a book for Oxford University Press on the subject of global corporate social responsibility titled Incorporating Rights: Corporate Social Responsibility, Conscious Communities and Transnational Order. 

Dean Kevin Johnson Dean | University of California, Davis School of Law

Dean Kevin Johnson
Dean | University of California, Davis School of Law
 

Patricia Jurewicz Director | Responsible Sourcing Network

Patricia Jurewicz

Director | Responsible Sourcing Network

Patricia Jurewicz is the founder and Director of the Responsible Sourcing Network, which she started as a project of As You Sow in 2010. Currently she sits on governing or advisory committees for the Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Mineral Trade, the Cotton Coalition, ICCR’s Human Trafficking Group, and the Conflict Free Smelter Program.

Ms. Jurewicz started managing the Human Rights department inside As You Sow’s Corporate Social Responsibility Program in 2006. In that role she led the Human Rights Program to tackle labor abuses at the factory level, she contributed to the report Best Current Practices in Purchasing: The Apparel Industry, and she began ground-breaking work addressing forced labor and extortion at the commodity level of supply chains. She previously worked at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP), directing the Global Cooperation Project. She co-authored a report entitled, The Treaty Database: U.S. Compliance with Global Treaties. While employed at Gap, Inc. she spearheaded a rewrite of the company’s Vendor Handbook, which was distributed to 3000 manufacturing facilities worldwide.

 

Prof. Deborah Levison Professor, Humphrey School of Public Affairs | University of Minnesota

Prof. Deborah Levison

Professor, Humphrey School of Public Affairs |  University of Minnesota

Deborah Levison is an economist and demographer. Levison studies the work and schooling of children in poor countries, typically via quantitative analysis of survey data and also through qualitative approaches. Recent projects have focused on the effect of Egyptian girls’ household work on their school attendance; on child domestic servants in Latin America; and on children in risky work in Brazil. Her co-authored book, RIGHTS AND WRONGS OF CHILDREN’S WORK (2010), explores the place of work in children’s lives and development. Other research areas include child care and women’s employment. Levison is one of the investigators on the IPUMS-International project

(www.ipums.org), which is dedicated to collecting, archiving, and distributing census data from around the world.

She earned a doctorate in economics from the University of Michigan, where she also trained at the Population Studies Center. She spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University’s Economic Growth Center before joining the University of Minnesota in 1992. She is a Professor at the University’s Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, where she has received multiple teaching awards. Her sabbatical years have been spent at the International Labour Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (2001-2002) and as a technical advisor to the Whole Village Project in Tanzania (2009-2010).

Her groundbreaking book co-authored with Michael Bourdillon, William Myers, and Ben White, Rights and Wrongs of Children’s Work, Rutgers University Press (2010), considers international policies governing children’s work, observes the complexity of the assessment of outcomes, and questions current child labor policies and interventions.

 

Dr. William Myers 

Visiting Scholar, Department of Human Ecology | University of California,  Davis
 

Ms. Mil Niepold Senior Mediator | Consensus Building Institute

Ms. Mil Niepold

Senior Mediator | Consensus Building Institute

Mil Niepold is Senior Mediator at the Consensus Building Institute where she specializes in convening multi-stakeholder dialogues around complex social issues and focuses on corporate stakeholder engagement, human rights, vulnerable populations, natural resource and land use management, and global voluntary standards development. She has worked with First Lady Dominique Ouattara to design a first-ever multi-stakeholder oversight committee to address the elimination of child labor in Côte d’Ivoire and analyzed corporate stakeholder engagement lessons from the extractives sector and tailored them for use in the agriculture sectors.

As Senior Policy Advisor at Verité for nearly 14 years, Ms. Niepold led a number of new initiatives including Verité’s work on women in the workplace (with UNIFEM and Calvert Social Investments) and multi-stakeholder initiatives, with a focus on programs to implement the Harkin – Engel Protocol on child labor in cocoa production. Ms. Niepold has extensive experience working with governments, including those of the United States, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, and France, among others. Prior to joining Verité, she was Strategic Advisor to Ambassador Swanee Hunt. Previously, her corporate social responsibility work spanned both private sector with Fortune 500 companies such as American Express and the public sector with organizations such as UNICEF, the European Union, the French Trade Office and Social Accountability International.

Mil holds degrees in International Affairs and European Studies from George Washington University and L’Institut des Sciences Politiques in Aix-en-Provence, France as well as a Certificate in International Human Rights Law from Oxford University, UK.

 

Ms. Jane Nyambura Program Coordinator for Africa | Ethical Tea Initiative

Ms. Jane Nyambura

Program Coordinator for Africa | Ethical Tea Initiative

Jane Nyambura is the Ethical Tea Partnership’s Programme Coordinator for Africa and is responsible for supporting ETP’s work programs in the region. Ms. Nyambura, who herself is a tea farmer, was previously employed by Africa Now as the Regional Manager for Ethical Business Services in East Africa. Ms. Nyambura has a degree in Business Administration majoring in Marketing, and a MBA in Strategic Management. Having worked for the Kenya Tea Development Agency (KTDA) for 7 years in charge of standards compliance, she has extensive first-hand experience of working with smallholder famers. Another significant part of her role at KTDA was helping tea and coffee factories to attain Fairtrade and Rainforest Alliance certification, while also monitoring the Ethical Teal Partnership’s assessments.

Mr. Paul Rosenthal Partner | Kelley, Drye & Warren LLP

Mr. Paul Rosenthal

Partner | Kelley, Drye & Warren LLP

A graduate of the UC Davis School of Law, Mr. Rosenthal is a partner in Kelley Drye’s Washington, D.C. office and co-chair of the Government Relations and Public Policy practice group. He has more than 35 years of experience in international trade and government relations matters and more than 12 years of experience working with the international cocoa and chocolate industry, the governments of the United States, Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire, international organizations and non-governmental entities.

Mr. Rosenthal assists a wide variety of companies and industries, including manufacturing, technology, and food and agriculture. He has appeared before all of the U.S. trade agencies and trade courts. He also has represented clients in disputes involving the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), as well as multilateral and bilateral negotiations.

Mr. Rosenthal’s government relations practice involves trade and non-trade issues before Congress and the Executive Branch. He also acts as general counsel or Washington counsel to several trade associations. Mr. Rosenthal previously served as counsel to the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs for over five years.

 

Mr. Damien Sanfilippo

Director of Standards and Assurances | Better Cotton Initiative
 

Mr. Damien Sanfilippo Director of Standards and Assurances | Better Cotton Initiative

Dr. Harold Schmitz


Chief Science Officer | Mars, Inc.
Senior Scholar in Management | University of California, Davis Graduate School of Management
 
Ms. Natasha Schwarzbach Head of Engagement | Bonsucro

Ms. Natasha Schwarzbach

Head of Engagement | Bonsucro

Natasha Schwarzbach has worked at Bonsucro since July 2008. During this period, she created the architecture for the Production Standard, designed and implemented a global Stakeholder Outreach program, led the strategic development and execution of rebranding, coordinated the Bonsucro EU RED submission, developed the auditor training strategy and helped to coordinate the first Bonsucro certification to ensure alignment.

Ms. Schwarzbach engages with all stakeholders across the value chain and is responsible for the development of the outreach programme, communication, building partnerships and plays a pivotal role in membership recruitment.

Dr. Howard-Yana Shapiro Chief Agricultural Officer | Mars, Inc. Senior Fellow | University of California, Davis

Dr. Howard-Yana Shapiro

Chief Agricultural Officer | Mars, Inc.
Senior Fellow | University of California, Davis

Dr. Howard-Yana Shapiro is the Chief Agricultural Officer at Mars Inc. and Adjunct Professor in the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at the University of California, Davis. He joined the company in 1997 and since then has guided Mars toward the goal of 100% sustainably sourced cacao production. Dr. Shapiro has more than 40 years of experience working with sustainable agricultural and agroforestry systems, plant systems, plant genetics and food production systems across the world, including in Europe, Asia, Africa, Mesoamerica, South America and the United States. His latest projects include directing Mars’ global cacao genome sequencing work in conjunction with IBM and the USDA’s agricultural research service, engaging the African Union to implement an economically sound ecological roadmap for Africa and beginning the genomics and plant breeding on the African traditional food crops. Dr. Shapiro leads the Multi-Disciplinary Research Unit, an internal think tank collaboration between Mars Inc., the University of California, Davis, and the University of Nottingham, England.

He has twice been a university professor, twice a Fulbright Scholar, twice a Ford Foundation Fellow and winner of the prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities Award. He has worked with indigenous communities, non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies and private institutions throughout the world and many national and regional agricultural institutions as an advisor and policy maker including the Gates Foundation, World Bank, UNDP-GEF, United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, ICRAF (The World Agroforestry Centre), Conservation International, WWF, International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Mexico, Brazil, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Haiti, Ghana, Cameroon, Cote D’Ivoire, Senegal, South Africa, Vietnam, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Bougainville, Thailand, Cambodia, China, the Philippines, and Australia. He is the author of multiple books, including Chocolate: History, Culture and Heritage (2009); The Science of Theobroma Cacao: Botany, Chemistry & Medicine (2010); and The Future of Agroforestry and Land Use Globally (2010).

 
Mr. Nick Weatherill Executive Director | International Cocoa Initiative

Mr. Nick Weatherill

Executive Director | International Cocoa Initiative

Nick Weatherill has been the Executive Director at the International Cocoa Initiative since September 2011, leading the foundation’s efforts to strengthen child protection and tackle child labor in cocoa growing. As a multi-stakeholder initiative driving good practice and collective action, ICI promotes a model of shared responsibility for eliminating child labor. ICI currently operates in Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire, with a strategy that focuses on evidence-building, community empowerment, national capacity-strengthening and responsible supply-chain management. Prior to joining ICI, Mr. Weatherill worked for 17 years in the humanitarian sector, for the European Commission, the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), and for a number of NGOs. Specializing in food security, livelihoods and public heath, he developed international policies, defined intervention strategies, and coordinated relief and recovery operations across 22 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa.

 


KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Spring 2012 Speaker Series

Dr. Ekkehard Strauss, Former Human Rights Officer at the U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

Popular Unrest in the Middle East & North Africa Region - Dawn of Universal Recognition of Human Rights for All?

Monday, March 26, 2012 - 12:00 PM - KH 1002 - Lunch served

Dr. Ekkehard Strauss holds a doctoral degree in international law and human rights from the University of Potsdam/ Germany. Following experience in academia, government and the private sector, he was seconded, from 1998-2001, to the OSCE to serve in different functions in Missions in Bosnia-Herzegovina and the, then, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. He joined the petitions team of OHCHR in 2001. In 2002, he was assigned Desk Officer for the countries of former Yugoslavia. In 2004, he joined the Department of Political Affairs in New York to support the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide in establishing his office and develop his working methods. Following the end of the mandate of the first Special Adviser in 2007, he joined the OHCHR New York Office to participate in the development and implementation of strategies related to the protection of civilians, the responsibility to protect, peacekeeping, peacebuilding and conflict prevention. Throughout his career, Dr. Strauss published extensively on protection of minorities, prevention of human rights violations, post-conflict peacebuilding and human rights responses to mass atrocities. Currently, he is on leave from the UN and works as consultant and researcher from Rabat, Morocco. He has been appointed adjunct professor at Griffith University, Australia.

 

Naz Modirzadeh

Naz Modirzadeh, J.D., Fellow at the HLS-Brookings Projects on Law and Security, Harvard Law School

Counterterrorism and Humanitarianism on a Crash Course?:

The Impact of "Material Support" Laws on Humanitarian Assistance in Situations of Armed Conflict

Tuesday,  March 13, 2012 - 12PM - Room 1001, Kalmanovitz Appellate Advocacy Moot Courtroom - Davis, CA

Naz Modirzadeh is a Fellow at the HLS-Brookings Project on Law and Security at Harvard Law School. She is the former Associate Director of the Program on Humanitarian Conflict Research at Harvard University. At HPCR, Ms. Modirzadeh managed the international humanitarian law and Middle East portfolios. She previously worked for Human Rights Watch, and later served as Assistant Professor and Director of the International Human Rights Law graduate program at the American University in Cairo. Ms. Modirzadeh has carried out field research and trainings in the Middle East and Afghanistan, focusing on the intersections between Islamic law, international human rights and humanitarian law, and post-conflict legal reform. Her publications include policy and monitoring reports on the use of torture, the application of IHL, and human rights in post-war Afghanistan. Ms. Modirzadeh received her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley and her J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Ms. Modirzadeh’s recent article identifies two countervailing sets of norms for engaging in armed conflict. The first promotes humanitarian engagement with non-state armed groups (NSAGs), in order to protect populations in need, and promote compliance with the rules of international humanitarian law (IHL). The second prohibits such engagement with listed ‘terrorist’ groups, by curtailing financial and other forms of material support, in order to protect security, despite some of these groups qualifying as NSAGs under IHL. This lecture explores how this conflict of norms might affect the capacity of humanitarian organizations to deliver life-saving assistance in areas under the control of one of these groups. 
 

LamisDeek 

Lamis Deek, J.D.

Islamophobia: The New McCarthyism?

January 26, 2012, 12:00 - 1:00 pm

KH Room 1001, Lunch Served

Lamis Deek is a Palistinian Attorney, Human Rights Advocate and Community Organizer with a private practice in NYC, co-Vice President of the New York Chapter of the NLG and convenor of the NLG-NY's Muslim Defense committee. She will focus on the legal tactics required to effectively fight widespread anti-Muslim racism, from media to court rooms. She will examine the powerful anti-Muslim movement and how it trickles into the legal system; give insight into the lawsuits arising from the mosque attacks in NYC's Sheepshead Bay, as well as the recent Rye Park Playland cases out of New York; and discuss the anti-Muslim racism in police dealings, and de-evolution in the criminal field, with detailed accounting of types of surveillance & daily practices of law enforcement in the survellances. 

 

Fall 2011 Speaker Series

Professor Wing 

Professor Adrien K. Wing of the University of Iowa School of Law -

The "Arab Fall":  The Future of Women’s Rights

Tuesday,  Sept. 27, 2011 - 4PM - Room 1001, Kalmanovitz Appellate Advocacy Moot Courtroom - Davis, CA

Global attention has been focused on the revolutionary changes taking place in the Middle East and North Africa throughout 2011.  In this lecture, Professor Adrien K. Wing brings nearly thirty years of experience and expertise in the study of law, politics and the history of the Middle East and North Africa and a critical race feminist perspective to assess the amazing events of what many political scientists, academics and popular commentators have labeled the “Arab Spring” or the “Revolutionary Era.” 


Emphasizing that women’s rights must not be forgotten, Professor Wing will begin with an analysis of women’s issues in the region prior to the events that sparked the Revolutionary Era in Tunisia and Egypt in December 2010-January 2011.  Following an analysis about what has happened over this past year and what is likely to happen in 2012, the lecture will conclude with some discussion about next steps and the position of women's rights in the Revolutionary Era in selected countries.  International human rights, international humanitarian law, constitutional law and family law are among the topics that will also be addressed. 

Professor Wing is the Bessie Dutton Murray Professor of Law at the University of Iowa School of Law and Bette & Wylie Aitken Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at Chapman University School of Law.  She earned her B.A. at Princeton University, her M.A. at UCLA and her J.D. at Stanford Law School and teaches courses in International Human Rights, Law in the Muslim World, Constitutional Law and Critical Race Theory.


Reception to follow with light refreshments.

This event is co-sponsored by the California International Law Center at King Hall (CILC)

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Rebecca Cohen

Rebecca Cohen, J.D.

Producer of WAR DON DON, Guest Lecturer at Harvard Law School

Monday, Oct. 24, 2011 - Time and Location TBD

Ms. Cohen is an Emmy-nominated filmmaker and a lecturer on law at Harvard Law School. She graduated from Brown University with a B.A. in Portuguese and Brazilian Studies. She received her Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School, where she now teaches. She is the producer of the international human rights film WAR DON DON, and interned as an investigator at the Bronx Defenders doing investigative work at the Special Court for Sierra Leone for Alex Tamba Brima in the AFRC-accused case. 

WAR DON DON profiles the trial of a leader of a separate warring faction in Sierra Leone. For her work on WAR DON DON she was awarded the Cinereach Award for excellence in vital, artful storytelling and the Hugo Munsterberg Award for psychology of human nature in cinema. WAR DON DON also won the Special Jury Prize at the SXSW Film Festival and was nominated for two Emmy Awards: Outstanding Continuing Coverage of a News Story (Long Form) and Outstanding Editing. In 2010 Ms. Cohen was profiled in Filmmaker Magazine's 25 New Faces in Independent Film as an "up-and-comer poised to shape the next generation of independent film." JILP may screen her movie sometime this school year, so look out for it! 

 

 

 

Judge Donoghue

The Honorable Judge Joan Donoghue presents, "International Law and Today’s Global Challenges: A Briefing from the Hague"

Tuesday, August 30, 4 PM, Room 1001 - Kalmanovitz Appellate Courtroom - Davis, CA

The Honorable Judge Donoghue will deliver a public lecture in the Kalmanovitz Appellate Courtroom about contemporary challenges for international law.  The Honorable Judge Joan Donoghue is the first American woman on the bench of the International Court of Justice and only the third woman elected to the Court.

This event is co-sponsored by the California International Law Center at King Hall (CILC)

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Spring 2011 Speaker Series

Dr. Nidal Jurdi

Dr. Nidal Jurdi, Ph.D. - American University of Beirut

The International Criminal Court, The Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL), and National Court Systems    
April 19, 2011 - 12pm - Room 1001 - Kalmanovitz Appellate Moot Courtroom - Davis, CA
A seasoned expert in International Criminal Law, Post-Conflict Resolution, and International Humanitarian Law in the Middle East and North Africa, and Lecturer in International Law & Organizations at the American University of Beirut, Dr. Jurdi will address how the International Criminal Court (ICC) navigates a delicate relationship with diverse national judicial systems under Articles 17 and 20 of the Rome Statute. In this Spring 2011 Speaker Series Event, Dr. Jurdi will examine some of the modalities and complexities of interaction between international courts and domestic jurisdictions, focusing on the ICC and the Special Tribunal For Lebanon (STL), and presenting material from his recently published book, The International Criminal Court and National Courts: A Contentious Relationship.
 Dr. Jurdi arrives at UC Davis Law upon return from a recent visit to Tunisia. Accordingly, Dr. Jurdi hopes to provide his initial take as a scholar on current events and the movement for constitutional reform in Tunisia, as well as a brief Q&A session on key human rights protections available to active participants in emerging popular democratic movements throughout the region.

In August 2005, Dr. Jurdi joined the ICC as a Law Clerk at the Office of the Prosecutor, focusing primarily on Darfur and the Middle East. In September 2006, he worked as a Legal Consultant for a UN International Independent Investigative Commission (UNIIIC) in the Middle East. Dr. Jurdi has frequently been called upon as an expert resource for a number of Human Rights and International Criminal Law trainings in Morocco, Jordan, Qatar, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Egypt, Tunisia, and Lebanon. Dr. Jurdi has also published a number of works on the ICC, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL), and on human rights in Lebanon and the Middle East North Africa (MENA) region.
Since 2007, he has worked as a Human Rights Officer at OHCHR-ROME, and currently serves as a Lecturer in International Law and Organizations at the American University of Beirut.
 
 

 
This event is co-sponsored by the 
 


Winter 2011 Speaker Series

Pocar

Judge Fausto Pocar - Italian Jurist; Professor of International Law

March 3, 2011 - 12pm - Room 1001 - Kalmanovitz Appellate Moot Courtroom - Davis, CA

Judge Pocar was an elected member of the Human Rights Committee of the United Nations from 1984 to 2000, serving as the Committee's chairman from 1991 to 1992. He served in the Italian delegation to the UN General Assembly in New York and to the Commission of Human Rights in Geneva several times. In 1999, he was appointed as a judge to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, and was President of that tribunal from November 2005 to November 2008. He is also a member of the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda since 2000.

This event is co-sponsored by the California International Law Center at King Hall (CILC)

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Greenwood

Judge Christopher Greenwood - Judge, International Court of Justice; Professor of International Law

March 1, 2011 - 4-6pm - Room 1001 - Kalmanovitz Appellate Moot Courtroom - Davis, CA

Judge Greenwood is currently a judge on the International Court of Justice (ICJ). From 1996 until 2009 he was a professor of international law at the prestigious London School of Economics. He has numerous appearances as Counsel before the ICJ, the European Court of Human Rights, the Court of Justice of the European Communities, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, and various international arbitration tribunals.

This event is co-sponsored by the California International Law Center at King Hall (CILC)

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Fall 2010 Speaker Series

Venturini

Professor Gabriella Venturini - Professor of International Law

September 7, 2010 - 12pm - Room 1001 - Kalmanovitz Appellate Moot Courtroom - Davis, CA

[Watch now]

A renowned international law scholar from the University of Milan, Professor Venturini has worked as a consultant for the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and was part of the Italian delegation for the establishment of the International Criminal Court. She is member of the Space Law committee of ILA.

During the last decades, international criminal justice has been dramatically developing, and a number of courts and tribunals have been established aimed at prosecuting persons responsible for the most serious violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, committed either in international armed conflicts or in situations of internal strife.

In the 1990s, the international community made a significant effort to build up purely international institutions, even in situations connected to a single country, such as the former Yugoslavia or Rwanda. During the last decade, in similar cases – such as those of Sierra Leone, Cambodia, Lebanon, East Timor, Kosovo – the international community has increasingly turned to mixed tribunals, which gather resources from both the international community and the state where the alleged crimes have occurred.

Professor Venturini’s presentation focused on these two different vehicles of international criminal justice. While international prosecutions and mixed tribunals share much in common, they also differ in important ways, from subject-matter jurisdiction to applicable law and procedure.

Professor Venturini also explored the general merits and pitfalls of international criminal justice, and more specifically, the relative advantages and disadvantages of international prosecutions and mixed tribunals.

This event was co-sponsored by the California International Law Center at King Hall (CILC)

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Welcome

The staff of the UC Davis Journal of International Law and Policy (“JILP”) is excited to publish its nineteenth volume this year. The UC Davis Journal of International Law and Policy publishes semi-annually and strives to contribute pertinent and interesting scholarly works to the field of international law.

Speaker Series

JILP is pleased to host several speakers throughout the year, ranging from lectures given by renown professors to judges on international tribunals. The series will continue throughout the year, in place of our annual symposium. Read more »

Upcoming CILC Events

http://www.law.ucdavis.edu/centers/cilc/